Dean Evans     
year
2001
2002
2003
totals
ab
178
144
218
540
r
30
24
32
86
h
49
50
73
172
bi
19
19
27
65
2b
2
6
4
12
3b
0
1
0
1
hr
7
8
14
29
so
54
45
80
179
bb
11
11
12
34
ab/k
3.30
3.20
2.73
3.02
ob
.317
.394
.370
.359
slg
.404
.569
.546
.506
ba
.275
.347
.335
.319
rat
22.43
28.48
27.43
26.03
ab/hr
25.42
18.00
15.57
18.62
ab/bi
9.37
7.58
8.07
8.31

year
2001
2002
2003
totals
w
3
2
4
9
l
6
2
7
15
ip
33.1
33.0
46.0
112.1
h
59
42
76
177
r
51
38
65
154
so
30
43
63
136
bb
30
21
43
94
hr
28
24
24
76
bf
185
157
258
600
oavg
.381
.309
.353
.350
era
6.13
4.61
5.65
5.48
rat
3.73
19.96
9.72
10.73
k/4
3.60
5.21
5.48
4.84
bb/4
3.60
2.55
3.74
3.35
hr/4
3.36
2.91
2.09
2.71

Notes:
Dean Evans could build an argument as to being the most dedicated player in the league from 2001-2003, a three-year stretch than spanned his full career. During that time he averaged 180 ABs per season, topped only by Scott Carmichael (numerous 2-man gamedays increased his AB total) and Joe Creighton (the Commish had to be at every gameday). Darnell Uhland may have passed that number if he actually lived in Chico for the first half of 2003 rather than have to fly up from SD every other weekend, but the point remains that Dean was very very very dedicated. His batting was, is, and always will be very underrated. Skinny and unathletic-appearing, Dean still managed to hit .319 for his career, 15 points higher than the man who vowed to retire everytime Dean got a basehit off him. Since he had relatively little power though, and since at times he would seem without any talent whatsoever, everyone was always surprised at the end of the day when the statbook said Dean quietly went 9-23 in his three games.

That being said, Dean's pitching was, aside from rare moments of brilliance, putrid. Still, he seemed to find another level when pitching to Seth Yoder, who was unofficially 2-47 with 35 Ks in his career vs. Dean.

--2001 Rookie of the Year
--Only in-game house-shot hit to right field in league history