Mark Montgomery     
year
1997
1998
1999
2000
totals
ab
17
131
230
48
422
r
3
24
33
14
74
h
6
37
65
14
122
bi
1
25
30
15
71
2b
0
2
4
1
7
3b
0
0
0
0
0
hr
0
11
15
6
32
so
7
49
78
13
147
bb
2
1
18
8
29
ab/k
2.43
2.67
2.95
3.69
2.87
ob
.353
.288
.335
.436
.335
slg
.421
.550
.496
.750
.526
ba
.353
.282
.283
.318
.289
rat
23.08
26.55
24.71
35.72
26.29
ab/hr
0.00
11.91
15.33
8.00
13.61
ab/bi
17.00
5.24
7.67
3.20
5.94

year
1997
1998
1999
2000
totals
w
1
3
3
1
8
l
0
5
7
1
13
ip
4.0
31.0
54.0
13.0
102.0
h
1
47
87
6
141
r
0
34
58
6
98
so
1
42
74
18
135
bb
1
8
18
3
30
hr
0
18
22
5
49
bf
14
148
256
49
467
oavg
.077
.336
.366
.130
.323
era
0.00
4.39
4.30
1.85
3.84
rat
67.10
21.64
21.10
47.35
26.10
k/4
1.00
5.42
5.48
5.54
5.29
bb/4
1.00
1.03
1.33
0.92
1.18
hr/4
0.00
2.32
1.63
1.54
1.92

Notes:
Debuting during the terrible 1997 season, it might surprise people to learn that Mark Montgomery was, for a brief period of time, our most dedicated player. Laid back and easy to get along with, Mark was your middle-of-the-road guy, capable of embarassing himself and then his opponent in the span of only a couple minutes. His 230 ABs in 1999 set a record and still stands as the #4 mark of all time. (if you count playoff numbers as well it jumps to #2). In addition to reliable service in the late-90s, Mark also played a big role in the video production aspect of the league. Whether it be shooting, editing, or providing the voice of Steve McClean on the bi-annual Byrd Awards, Mark's help made many things possible for the growth of the league into the 21st century. He retired about a third the way through the 2000 season due to lack of interest, ironically during what was shaping to be his finest season yet.